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BROOKLYN BRANCH 

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RABBI ISAAC ELCHANAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

YESHIVA UNIVERSITY HIGH SCHOOL 

1060 PRESIDENT STREET 

BROOKLYN 25. N. Y. 



Phone: main 2-6S14- lOOI 



MAIN OFFICE 

18STH ST. & AMSTERDAM AVE. 

New York 33, N. Y. 

WAdsworth 7-0300 



Compliments of the first graduating 

class of the 
BROOKLYN BRANCH YESHIVA UNIVERSITY 






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http://www.archive.org/details/elchanitebrookly1948unse 



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A few years ago, four Yeshivot Ktanot, the Crown Heights, 
the Etz Chaim, the Ohel Moshe, and the Flatbush Yeshivah, had 
a vision. They dreamt of a branch of the Talmudical Academy 
in Brooklyn. This vision was reahzed when each of these Yeshivot 
advanced a sizeable sum of money in order to build this brunch. 



We, the class of June 1948, are the tirst graduates of the 
Brooklyn Branch of the Talmudical Academy. We wish in our 
small measure to show our appreciation towards these four 
Yeshivot for their enabling us to continue our Jewish education. 
We dedicate to them, this, the first issue of the Brookhn I'lchan- 
ite, our "Bikurim." 



EL(;ilil.\ITE 




June, 1948 

To The Graduating Class of Talmudical Academy: 

I am proud of the good record which you have established in the Yeshiva, and 
Talmudical Academy, Our experience has shown that the graduates of our own High 
School are best qualified to continue their studies at the Yeshiva University. 

You have had a good start and upon you rests the responsibility of continuing 
to carry the Torch of Torah, and worldly wisdom in your future years of maturity. 
Above all you should remember that you are b'nei ha-Yeshiva, and the learning 
of Torah and living according to the tenets of our sacred traditions must be the 
prime movers of your life. You leave the Talmudical Academy with the education 
which you have garnered in this fruitful field. But with patience and courage you will 
discover in your future years, at the Yeshiva, even larger fields of Torah knowledge 
and secular learning. Let the moral and religious inspirations which you have re- 
ceived from your teachers be the central points of your life. 

I congratulate you all on you,r accomplishment, and I am confident that in your 
future life and careers you will be worthy of your school. May G-d be with you. 

Sincerely yours, 

Samuel Belkin, President 



1948 



Fji'e 



ZJo Une Qraduatlng, 
Claii ol 1948 




My dear young friends: 

Thirty years ago, next June, a small group of young pioneers, but six in number, 
received their high school diplomas from the first, and for many years, the only ac- 
credited high school organized, managed, and supervised by people of the Jewish 
faith — the Talmudical Academy. Since that first graduation in 1919, several thousand 
Jewish young men have gone forth from our sacred walls to swell the ever-growing tide 
of young men and young women who complete their high school studies each year. 

To-day, you are about to join their ranks. You are the first ones of that fortunate 
group of young pioneers, graduates from the Brooklyn Yeshivoth K'tanos, to complete 
your high school studies in the Brooklyn Branch of Talmudical Academy, and to 
merit the award which you have so richly earned. 

Many were the obstacles you had to overcome. Many difficulties beset your path 
from the first day you set foot in our Yeshiva, but great is the achievement you have 
accomplished. Not only have you received a secular education which, judged by any 
and all standards set up by the local and state departments of education, has been 
proved to be at least the equal of that given in the public institutions of our city, 
but you have also received that rich heritage of learning and spirituality which has 
been handed down by our ancestors for thousands of years. Whereas your brothers 
and sisters in the public high schools have received only a secular education, you, 
the graduates of Talmudical Academy, have received, in addition, a thorough ground- 
ing in Talmud, Bible, Hebrew language and literature, Jewish history and cognate 
studies. Your lives are richer and fuller and more closely attuned to the traditions and 
hopes and aspirations — to the heartbeat — of our people. 

Even a casual examination of the roster of names that appears in our high school 
alumni bulletin will cause the heart of every self-respecting Jew to swell with pride 
and satisfaction. Among their number one finds some of the most worth-while citizens 
of our community and country. Every walk of life, every trade and profession is 
duly represented. Not only rabbis and preachers, religious leaders and teachers, but 
communal workers, teachers and administrators in secular schools, colleges and uni- 
versities, lawyers, artisans, business men, engineers, dentists, doctors, artists, and 
musicians received their first training in Talmudical Academy. Every part of our 
country, every segment of our national Jewish life, is permeated and enriched by the 
contributions which our graduates have to offer to make up the sum total of human 
experience. 

As we look back with justifiable pride upon the thousands who have preceded 
you, we can only hope and pray that you, their younger brothers, will follow in 
their foot-steps. We pray that you will hold precious those high standards and lofty 
ideals of citizenship and service, of faith in, and loyalty to, our American democracy 
that we have tried to inculcate in you, and that you will put into living practice, 
and uphold in your daily lives, the sacred laws and traditions of our holy Torah. 
May you prove a source of pride and joy to your parents and your Alma Mater! 

Shelly R. Saphire, 

Principal 



Six 




Dear Graduates; 

It is with singular pride that I greet you, the first graduating class of the Brooklyn 
Branch of Talmudical Academy. Only three years have elapsed since you entered the 
portals of the world renowned Yeshiva Rabbi Isaac Elchanan. You were the first 
pioneers who made it possible to open our Branch, and today your graduation marks the 
successful completion of three years of work. If in the beginning the opening of our 
Yeshiva was only an experiment, today it is an established reality. What started out 
only as a branch has with your graduation become a fruit-bearing tree. It has grown 
during the course of your stay at Yeshiva from a student body of forty-eight to one 
close to two hundred, and from a faculty of a handful of men to one numbering 
more than two dozen. What is even more important — you have not been mere witnesses 
of this phenomenal growth but rather participants and the inspiration of this develop- 
ment. That you have given much to Yeshiva is an accepted fact — it is however of greater 
significance to evaluate what Yeshiva has done for you. 

It has been the aim of Yeshiva to provide you with more than a curriculum of 
prescribed and elective courses. To give you only the subjects required by State laws 
would not be fulfilling the purpose and goal of our institution. The establishment of 
a reputable and worthy school is not determined by curriculum alone. It is rather 
the spirit that pervades the Yeshiva and the philosophy that governs its administration 
that are the basic criteria in judging its value. It is the prime objective of the Yeshiva 
to develop Jews who are both cognizant and proud of practicing the tenets of our 
Torah, and at the same time to prepare them to live a wholesome life in our modern 
American environment. The organization of the faculty thus played a most prominent 
role in developing the character of our school and achieving its proposed aims. Your 
faculty consisted of a staff of well-qualified and competent teachers who are at the 
same time religious men possessing a positive attitude toward Jewish values. Many of 
them, graduates of our own Yeshiva University, are imbued both with the ideals of 
Judaism and the best in secular knowledge. In your daily contacts you came face to 
face with personalities who exemplified the harmonious blending and fusion of Jewish 
lore and secular learning. Yeshiva thus attempted to give you more than the routine book 
knowledge which any ordinary high school graduate receives. It has given you a positive 
outlook and approach to the exigencies and complexities of Jewish life, and inspired 
you with the zeal and enthusiasm to perpetuate the Torah way of life. 

May you as the potential lay and rabbinic leaders of the future American Jewish 
community, reflect in your thoughts and actions the teachings of our Torah, the inspir- 
ation of our Prophets, and the wisdom of our sages. May the Brooklyn Brancli always 
be able to point with pride to you, its first graduating class, its first thirteen pioneers. 
We trust and hope that the formal links which arc now forging between our Branch 
and the parent institution — Yeshiva University — will be strcngllienetl I rom year to 

year. 

Rabbi Abraham N. Zurolf, Administrator 



FACULTY 



Dr. Shelly Saphire Principal 

Rabbi Abraham Zuroff Administrator 

Mr. Harry Allan Art 

Rabbi Moshc Bcrenholtz Hebrew 

Mr. Isaac Cantor Spanish 

Rabbi Baruch Faivelson Hebrew 

Mr. Charles Friedman Science & Mathematics 

Mr. Jacob Godin French & Spanish 

Mr. Emery Grossman Music 

Mr. David Horn English & Civics 

Mr. Julius Jacobs Hygiene 

Mr. Julius Landowne ■. Biology 

Mr. Samuel Lebowitz Science 

Dr. Jechiel Lichtenstein French 

Mr. Martin Lilker Social Science & Mathematics 

Dr. Joseph Sarachek English 

Mr. Joseph Strum English 

Mr. Morris Turetsky Mathematics 

Mr. Samuel Levine Director 

Miss Marilyn Sherman Secretary 



1948 



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STANLEY BIENENFELD 

1450 48th St. 

G. O. Vice-President 2; Class President 7; Class 
Vice-President 3; Athletic manager 4; Basketball 
team 1 ; Hebreiv Club 5 ; Head of Library Staff 4 ; 
Academy Neu's Business Manager 5 ; T. A. Pub- 
lications 6; Elchanite Business Manager 6. 

The class is split on whether "Beanie" is a 
better Latin scholar than a Greek one or vice- 
versa. Des Gustibus ! There is no doubt, how- 
ever, that he will attend Y. U. and that he will 
become an industrial magnate. 

As a scholar, he's a good sivimmer. 





AlORDECAI KATZ 

1.^99 Carroll St. 

Arista 6, 7, 8 ; Class President 8 ; Class Vice- Presi- 
dent 2 ; Academy News Editor 3 ; Academy News 
Business Manager 4; T. A. Publications Business 
Manager 6, 8 ; Science Club 3 ; Hebrew Club 4 ; 
Club Debating Team 6. 

Morty, the school business manager, has been 
one of the mainstays of T. A. Publications 
since its formation. His scholastic ability is 
overshadowed only by his scientific achieve- 
ments. (He has been busy building television 
sets.) He will attend Polytech to set the pace 
in electrical engineering. 

Original propounder of the AAA, ads, ads, ads! 




NORMAN KATZ 

204 Ross St. 

Arista 6, 7, 8 ; Class President 6 ; Elchanite Editorial 
Board 8 ; Class Secretary 8 ; President of Science 
Club 3; Hebrew Club 4, 5; Charity Collector 2, 3, 
4, 5, 6; Class Debating Manager 8. 

When he has taken time off from studying 
Talmud, Normie has gained for himself quite 
a scholastic reputation. He has excelled in 
Math., History, Chemistry, and charity col- 
lecting. Norman has convinced Yeshiva to ac- 
cept him and he will probably become an ac- 
countant. 

Only 99.8 average — my, my, aren't we slipping? 



JACOB KRUMBBIN 

579A Crown St. 

Science Club 1 ; Hebrew Club 3 ; Debating Team 2, 
4, 6; Sanitation Manager 8. 

Good old Jake has been the class politician 
since he joined us a year ago. He intends to 
start his career at Y. U. Undoubtedly he will 
become an industrial typhoon (sic.) and he 
will preach capitalism to the unfortunates in 
Russia. 

Are you ajfUcted with inso/niiia, Jake? 



]F ALTER O REN ST BIN 

1365 Carroll St. 

Class Vice-President 8 ; Acaden/y News Editor 3 ; 
Academy Neivs Business Manager 5 ; Science Club 
2; Hebrew Club 3; School Choir Leader 6. 

Wally has gained for himself the reputation 
of class wit during his pleasant (?) stay at the 
Yeshiva. He hopes to start at CCNY and even- 
tually wind up at the Met. 

"h this a diploma I see before me? Come, let me 
clutch thee!'' 



NISSON SHULMAN 

967 53rd St. 

Arista Leader 6, 7, 8; G. O. President 3; Class 
President 4; Editor of Elchanite 8; Kolenu Editor 
4, 5, 6,; Academy News Sports Editor 4; T. A. 
Publications 6; Hebrew Club 3, 4; Science Club 
3; Class Debating Manager 4, 6; School Debating 
Team 6. 

"Nis" has been quite an orator during his high 
school career, having talked his way into G. O. 
presidency, Arista leadership, and the editor- 
ship of the Elchanite. He also entered a city- 
wide oratorical contest and was eliminated 
only after a bitter fight. "Nis" will go to 
Yeshiva and wants to become a radio commen- 
tator. 





AARON SKAIST 

109-25 48th St., Richmond HiU, L. I. 

Class Secretary 8; Athletic Manager 6; Assistant 
Editor of Academy N-ews 5; Hebrew Club 6; Li- 
brarian 5 ; Sanitation Manager 5 . 

Aaron, a nice quiet fella, joined us in fifth 
term but we're sorry he didn't come sooner. 
The youngest graduate of the class, he will 
continue his education at Y. U. He hopes to 
become an able history teacher in emulation of 
Mr. Lilker. 

He came from a good family but he lost the address. 



REUBEN STARISHEVSKY 

216 Bay 32nd St. 

Class Vice-President 4, 6 ; Class Secretary 4, 5 ; 
Reporter for Academy News 5 ; Hebrew Club 4 : 
Librarian 4, 6. 

"Starry" has been the star athlete of the class 
when he has not been learning Talmud. He 
will honor Yeshiva by accepting its invitation 
to him. There he hopes to receive the back- 
ground to become a great Surgeon. 

His high school daze will soon be over. 



WILLIAM W. JVEALCATCH 

926 E. 10th St. 

. Arista 6, 7, 8; School Secretary-Treasurer 2; Class 
Secretary 3, 6; Class Vice-President 8; Hebreiv Club 
4, 5; Business Manager of Kolenu 5; T. A. Publi- 
cations 6; Librarian 6, 8; Sanitation Manager 5. 

■Willie is one of the j oiliest, most robust boys 
in the class, always popping up with a joke 
at the right time. He intends to go to Y. U. 
and he wants to become an accountant. (May- 
be he and Norman will form a partnership). 

Finally made the T. A. Bored of Education. 



SEYMOUR WIESENFELD 

5115 13th Ave. 

Class President 2, 3; Class Vice-President 4; Class 

Secretary 5 ; Reporter for the Academy News 3 ; 

Hebrew Club 6; Debating Manager 8; Sanitation 

Manager 6. 

Seymour, the more brilliant and handsomer of 
the twins (except for Freddy), has distinguish- 
ed himself by doing nothing during his stay at 
the Yeshiva. He intends to do the same at 
CCNY. Toscanini has announced that he will 
retire as head of the N. B. C. Symphony 
Orchestra as soon as Seymour is ready to take 
over. In the meantime, Seymour is preparing 
himself for this great undertaking by work- 
ing part-time as a conductor ... on the BMT. 

Studying never interfered with his education. 



HERBERT W^EISBERG 

5723 12th Ave. 

Basketball Team 6; Academy News Editor 4, 5, 6; 

T. A. Publioations 8; Elchanite Editorial Board 8; 

.Hebrew Club A: Class Debating Manager 4, 5. 

Herbie's not really very garrulous but he's 
willing to give you his opinion on any sub- 
ject you ask for. Yeshiva will be the lucky 
college to get Herbie and then he will start 
on his quest to get the titles mentioned below. 

B.A.?, M.A.?, Ph.D.?, D.D.?. etc. All he needs 

now is a soapbox and a cigar. 

Camera Shy 

FRED W^IESENFELD 

5115 13th Ave. 

G. O. Vice-President 3,' Class President 4: Class 
Vice-President 5 ; Class Athletic Manager 6 ; Re- 
porter for the Academy News 4; Hebrew Club 4. 
The elder of the Wiesenfeld twins (by five 
minutes) gained quick popularity when he 
first entered T. A. He hopes to continue his 
education at City College and then soar to 
great heights ... as an ace airplane pilot. 
He opens his books twice a term — to see if they're 
his. 

ISAAC WINOGRAD . 

1921 Avenue K 

Arista 7, 8; Athletic Manager 6; Basketball team 

6, 8; Elchanite Editorial Board 6. 8; Librarian 5, 6; 

Class Debating Manager 3; Sanitation Manager 4. 
"Winnie," a loyal Chicagoan, is a rabid bas- 
ketball enthusiast and he has proven his abilit)' 
by making the Yeshiva basketball team. He 
will attend Y. U. and will major in Psychiatry. 
(He is NOT crazy). 

He had nothing t<> do so he did it in T. A. 






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SEPTEMBER, 1945 



Received a letter yesterday 



Dear Sir: 

You have the honor of registering in our institution 
for its first term in Brooklyn. 

Rabbi A. Zuroff 
Talmudical Acadetiiy 

Building located corner Bedford Avenue and President Street. Elated ... Set 
out this morning with my best "yarmulke" in pocket ... At corner of Bedford and 
President, thought there was some mistake — no magnificent edifice as expected . . . 
inquired for T. A. in odd-looking two-story building . . . place in uproar, painters, 
carpenters, plumbers, electricians and rabbis all over the place . . . faint idea this was 
what I was looking for after being relieved of S8.50 . . . personal tour by Rabbi 
Zurott . . . Large room on first floor . . . 

This is our beautiful laborator)-," he explained. Saw four walls, ceiling, floor . . . 
no laborator)- . . .Upstairs: classrooms? library? lunchroom? auditorium? . . . the third 
floor and playground hold unlimited possibilities, don't they? 

OCTOBER, 1945 . . . First day . . . Buildmg cozy . . Even a play room . . Met swell 
bunch of fellows . . . also teachers . . . getting acquainted takes a long time. 

JANUARY, 1946 .. . CRAM FOR EXAM . . . Three days later . . . Exemptions an- 
nounced . . . aw, nuts, studied all that for nothing . . . have to take PT finals. 

FEBRUARY, 1946 . . . Same teachers . . . great, got them all figured out . . . New 
Biology teacher . . . "Why do bees buzz?" . . . Dining room opened . . . 

MARCH, 1946 . . . First words of new Geometry teacher: "What's the score?" 

APRIL, 1946 . . . Aaaaah! New secretary . . . Marilyn . . . What, no last name? 



Eighteen 



JUNE, 1946 . . . Spring fever and exams . . . What a combination I A week later . 
Exams over, vacation announced . . . Orenstein jumps in lake 

SEPTEMBER, 1946 . . . School again . , . Freshies just arrived . . . happy kids 
. . . They'll learn . , . Play room made into classroom . . . dining room used as play 
room part-time. 

OCTOBER, 1946 . . . Frosh Goldstein complains about Hebrew . . . what, a con- 
cession? . . . Finally learned why bees buzz . . . Wouldn't you buzz, if somebody 
took your and too? 

DECEMBER, 1946 . . . Mr. Grossman, and MUSIC REGENTS! What next? 
Albany, here he comes. 

JANUARY, 1947 . . . Happy New Year with Spanish regents just around the cor- 
ner .. . What's the past pluperfect of the imperative indicative of the verb 

... or is it a noun? . . . Got admit from Marilyn . . . Have decided to come home 
late again tomorrow . . . Library opened on 4-purpose top floor . . . (assembly hall, 
dining room, play room, library). 

FEBRUARY, 1947 . . . All fainted in unison when heard we passed language regents, 
except those who failed. 

MARCH, 1947 . . . History, civics, math, Hebrew — some load for poor Mr. Lilker . . . 
new custodian . . . poor man . . . Kolenu is born. 

MAY, 1947 ... Lag B'Omer, Alley Pond Park . . . Bienenfeld and Weisberg missing 
. . . Ramaz too 



JUNE, 1947 . . . Another year . . . rumors of a two and one half year course . . . 
Normie learns to dodge falling ceilings. 

SEPTEMBER, 1947 . . . First day of senior year . . . hand to face, no beard . . . 
why, an addition . . . Krumbein, the 13th man . . . does this start our hard luck? 
. . . Top Hoor partitioned — new classrooms . . . now, ^ purposes . . . 

OCTOBER, 1947 . . . Beginning to hnd it is not easy to get high marks , . . Mr. 
Horn, the underlying theme . . . Wliat are 72 immediate causes of the first SX'orld 
War? . . . Why does 3NaOH & C3Ht C17H31C02) & C3H5 (OH) 3? . . . 
or does it? . . . If a man invests $1763. i7 at 3 17/39% interest for sixteen years, 
four months, fi\c days, and thirteen minLitcs, how much money doe.s he receive? . . . 
work out by logarithms? . . . (an)4iody know the score?) 



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EICHMITE 



DECEMBER, 1947 . . . No time at all to study . . . Rabbi Faivelson's plan for a 
student to spend his leisure time . . . one "cheerful evening" a week at his Hebrew 
Club . . . raise money for "Food for the Hungry" campaign, for T. A. publications 
. . . sell tickets for his annual Tzedaka affair . . . write articles for Elchanite, Tatler, 
Kolenu . . . Gala Chanukah affair. 

JANUARY, 1948 . . . Three regents . . . buttons, pins, rings, senior hats, senior 
day . . . Somebody make a committee! . . . Tatler appears . . Top floor partitioned 
again — new classroom ... 6 purposes, including -study hall. 

FEBRUARY, 1948 . . . Two histories, two Englishes, seeing double . . . ("Double 
double, toil and trouble" ) . . . Willie runs for sec-treas . . . gives out 26 bow ties, 
gets 25 votes . . . GAZLAN! 

MARCH, 1948 . . . Nisson Shulman in city wide oratorical contest : . . What are 
you going to do with the $25 . . . Rabbi Faivelson see you yet? 

APRIL, 1948 . . . Senior buttons . . . Winograd stocks up for next ten years . . 
Starishevsky starts concession . . . both Fred and Seymour came to school on the 
same day ! . . Sandwich bar installed . . broken . . Porky sells sandwiches . . Lockers 
installed . . . No more halls . . . 

MAY, 1948 . . . Moving faster . . , Elchanite, assorted rallies . . . 100% disatten- 
dance . . . glass enclosed bulletin boards . . . 

JUNE, 1948 . . Graduation . . solemnity . . thoughts go back to the beginning . , 
new building on lot next door . . . Bedford Avenue and President Street. 

Mordecai Katz 



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Twenty 



Xast Mtll anb XTestament 



We, the first Graduates of T. A. Brooklyn, being at this time in no fit state of 
mind and body to be held responsible for what we say and do, hereby leave and be- 
queath the following to our beloved institution and its intimates: 

Clause I To Rabbi Zuroff we leave a special assortment of admit pads of a variety 

of colors. 

Clause II To Miss Sherman we leave automatic bells that ring five minutes late 
each period without any special attention. 

Clause III To Mr. Strum we leave a soft arm chair and a new Adam hat. (Ho-humI). 

Clause IV To Mr. Horn we leave a book without any underlying theme or purpose. 

Clause V To Mr. Grossman we leave a freshman class that will really appreciate 

its music period and a victrola that doesn't cry. 

Clause VI To Rabbi Faivelson we leave at the First National Bank 1,000,000 ad 
blanks, and a yarmulkah with glue on the inside. 

Clause VII To Mr. Lilker we leave the hope that someday PR will be used in T. A.'s 
elections. 

Clause VIII To Mr. Turetsky we leave a new "Drash" on the geometric proof of 
trisecting an angle. 

Clause IX To Mr. Godin we leave all the unfinished French homework. 

Clause X To Dr. Lichtenstein we leave an automatic average computator which 

computes averages without taking marks into consideration. 

Clause XI To Mr. Landowne we leave the duty of formulating a new theory of 
evolution based on the discovery of the connection between the seedless 

watermelon and the fossilized amoeba. 

Clause XII To Mr. Lebowitz we leave the task of splitting the electron and a new 
screwdriver with which to do it. 

Clause XIII To Mr. Cantor we leave a new language to get to the bottom of. 

Clause XIV To the ambitious pioneers of T. A. Brooklyn we leave the hope that 
someday they will see a new building with a swimming pool and a gym. 
(Note to future graduates: This clause may be reprinted word for word 
in your own Last Will and Testaments without charge). 

Clause XV To T. A. we leave a four year course in sanity, health, and happiness 
for the inmates of the future. 




In witness whereof we do here affix our hand and seal the 
twenty-eighth day of June, one thousand nine hundred and 
forty-eight. 

Signed, 

THE SENIOR CLASS 



Twenty-One 




EDITORS: W. ORENSTEIN, FRED WIESENFELD AND H. WEISBERG 




NEW HOSPITAL FOR MENTAL DISORDERS ESTABLISHED 

The cornerstone for the Chicago Institute of Insanity was laid today. Chief Psychi- 
atrist will be I. Winograd, B. S., M. S., I.N.C. (I.N.C, — Special degree given to 
psychiatrists upon becoming pyromaniacs. Requirements for this degree include the 
burning of a house and a car on one match.) 



BILLIONAIRE BUILDS NEW SCHOOL 




Stanley Bienenfeld whose immense fortune runs into logarithms, has just com- 
pleted the blueprints for his new school. Tuition is $1,000,000 per semester. The 
school consists of 10 gyms, 4 movie houses, 8 auditoriums, 6 saloons, 25 gambling 
dens, 3 solid gold offices, one classroom, and 125,000,000 students. School hours are 
all day every day except tor Yom-Kippur, and study hours are from 2:15 to 2:16, once 
^very leap year. 




HERO WINS MEDAL 



Fred Wiesenfeld, famous airplane engineer, just received his twenty-fifth flying 
medal. The medal was to be presented to Mr. Wiesenfeld on Sunday morning, March 
32, at 9:00 p.m. However, due to the fact that Mr. Wiesenfeld tried to undertake the 
diihcult flight from New Jersey to New York without a co-pilot, the medal will be 
awarded posthumously to Mrs. Wiesenfeld, when she will be with us next month. 

The medal is to be awarded by "Boss" Krumbein, substituting for "Fighting 
Willie the Weal" of the U. S. Army, who will be attending Smichah exercises at 
the Talmudical Academy Naval Training Center. 



$4 BILLION LOST 



Jacob Krumbein, billionaire, who invested five billion dollars in Dogpaw Gold 
mines, has lost four out of his five billions when it was discovered that the mine 
would yield nothing more than an occasional ton or two of radium. 

This has caused him to cut down on his expenses and he is now lighting his 
cigars with $100 checks instead of with two thousand dollar bills. This cut will have 
to continue until his printing press is fixed. 




MET GETS NEW STAR TENOR 

Cantor Walter Orenstein has been recently engaged by the Metropolitan Opera 
Co. When Mr. Orenstein was asked to sing "La Traviata." he refused because he wanted 
"to start from the bottom." 

After due deliberation, the Opera Co. finally arrived upon an appropriate posi- 
lion lor liic coloratura Icnor. He may now Ix' found in i!u' men's lounge selling 
lemonade. 

(Legs Orenstein got his start singing at beauty contests.) 




Twenty-Three 




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NEW PLAY HITS BROADWAY 




Nisson Shulman, famous Talmudywood actor, has been engaged recently by Ham, 
Ham, & Ham, Inc., in their forthcoming play, "Sookie." 

William Wilbur Wealcatch will play the feminine lead as Sookie's wife. 



OPERATION OF THE YEAR 



On the morning of March 31, Dr. Reuben Starishevsky, utilizing all his scientific 
skill, performed an outstanding operation. With decades of study in T. A. (way 
behind him), Dr. St--ky has successfully mended a broken head with one band-aid. 





T. A. BOY WINS TOP PRIZE 
ON RADIO BROADCAST 



Mordecai Katz, former Magna Cum Laude student of the Talmudical Academy 
and head of "Katz, Cats, and Kitten Television Corporation," appeared last night on 
the "T. A. Chochmoh' Hour." 

Mordecai won three washing machines, two airplanes and one radio tube for cor- 
rectly answering the question, "What was the name of Marconi's grandmother.'". (The 
answer was of course "Sookie.") 



WIESENFELD LEADS B.P.P.S.O. 






Ill 



Maestro Seymorio Marioti Wiesenfeld has just completed his tour of Canarsie with 
the Boro Park Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra. 

The maestro avers that his musical background was obtained in T. A. under the 
guidance of Professor Grossman. (He thinks Toscanini is good also.) His newest 
composition is entitled "La Talmudicale." 



FAMOUS HISTORIAN MAKES DISCOVERY 

A. Skaist, Yeshiva historian, recently astounded the scholars of Hellenistic history 
by revealing that Herodotus graduated from the "Athenian School of History" at 
the age of twelve, instead of, as is commonly believed, at the age of ten. According 
to reliable records, he states, Mr. Lilker failed him twice. 



n*)jii/ in 








RABBI MATHEMATICIAN HONORED 



Rabbi Dr. N. Katz of Yeshiva University was recently honored at special 
ceremonies for his epoch-shaking treatise — How many elephants can be drawn thro.-ih 
the eye of a needle.'' 

The distinction awarded him greatly lauded his prowess in using the trigonometric 
interpretation on the use of a slide rule in making his conclusions. 

The honor was climaxed by rendering him the title of "Profes.sor Ncedleye." 



EXTRA 




William "Sookie" Wealcatch is seriously contemplating leaving the highly suc- 
cessful play "Sookie" to take up race track announcing. (Unconfirmed reports have 
it that he is so infatuated with animals that he would even condescend to become a 
bookie. Whether he means a "bookie be'shas ' or an ordinary bookie, the report does 

not state.) 



EMINENT REFORMER RETURNS FROM EXPERIMENT 




Dr. Herbert Weisberg, B. A., M. A., Ph. D., has recently returned from his Pac- 
ific haven, Weisberg Island. 

HavintJ established a purely socialistic society on his Pacific Island in defiance of 
all civil, national, and religious codes, Mr. Weisberg was struck off the Alumni list 
of the Yeshiva University. 

The reason for his return was to officiate at the Bar-Mitzvah of the famout 
llabbi Norman Katz, and to obtain a new supply of his mother's Gefilte fish. 



cl. Lcnaniie. c:^iajt 




MR. HORN 



FACULTY ADVISERS 

RABBI FAIVELSON 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



Editor-hi-Chief 

NISSON SHULMAN 



NORMAN KATZ 



Associate Editors 

HERBERT WEISBERG 



ISAAC WINOGRAD 



MURRAY WACHMAN 

Art Editor 



PAUL SALKIN 

Photography Editor 



Business Managers 

STANLEY BIENENFELD MORDECAI KATZ 



Twenty-Eight 



We, of the Editorial Board of the Elchanite, would like to extend 
our heartiest thanks to the faculty adviser of the "Elchanite," Mr. 
Horn, and to the faculty adviser of T. A. Publications, Rabbi Faivel- 
son, with whose invaluable aid we have been able to publish this first 
Elchanite of the Brooklyn Branch of the Talmudical Academy. 




1 ^ -^ 49^ W 




We would also like to thank Murray Wachman, who did our art 
work; Paul Salkin, who did our photography work; and Richard Silver- 
man, our typist. 





Tweiily-Niim 



c4rUta 




by Norman Katz 

One year ago, at a school assembly, the first ten members of the Arista were 
installed. That was the beginning of a Yeshiva Arista composed of the highest ranking 
students in the school in character, scholarship and service. 

Since its formation, the Arista has created and attempted to fulfill several functions. 
A committee has been formed to supervise the collection of Seforim in the Yeshiva. 
The Arista Coaching Club has endeavored to help the weaker students of the school 
in their studies. Several boys have gone back to their former schools to try to persuade 
the graduates to attend T. A. The Arista is at present contemplating the formation of an 
Inter- Yeshiva League consisting of the Aristas of various Yeshivas. This term, ad- 
ditional three members have been inducted into the Arista. 

The last elections put into office Nisson Shulman as Leader, Samuel Feder as vice- 
Leader, and Richard Silverman as Secretary-Treasurer. Under the supervision and leader- 
ship of these officers, the Arista has been trying and will try to increase its service to 
the school and will endeavor to live up to its reputation of being an honor organization. 



Thirty 



^Ile. J-ibia%u 




The advent of a library in the Brooklyn branch of T. A. one year ago was due 
to the pioneering efforts of Mr. Lilker and Rabbi Faivelson, the faculty advisers. 
Mr. Lilker supervises the English department whereas Rabbi Faivelson has juris- 
diction over the Hebrew section. 

The library staff, which now consists of fourteen members, is under the leadership 
of Marvin Bienenfeld, Chief Librarian. Under a rotating schedule, two librarians 
are on duty daily and each member of the staff serves but half a term. 

The library is being enlarged constantly. Suggestions for the purchasing of books 
are made from time to time by various members of the faculty and the student body. 

Due to time limitation, library books are available for reference and circulation 
for only forty-fi\e minutes per day, from l:n P.M. until 2;00 P.M., except on Sundays 
and on Fridays. 

We feel th.it with the line cooperation of the student body, the continued success 
of our library is assured. 



Thirty -One 



'17. c^. <Pu.iLlcailon^ 




One of the most important events in the extra-curricular history of our school was 
the financial merger of the three T. A. publications: "Kolenu," the Hebrew newspaper, 
the "Tatler," the English newspaper, and the "Elchanite," the graduating journal. 

Rabbi Faivelson and Mr, Horn, the faculty advisers of T. A. Publications, have 
emphasized the great value of this merger. Because of it, the three publications involved 
have avoided inter-paper rivalry in the obtaining of advertisements; they have, through 
a joint effort, raised more funds than would ordinarily be possible; they have, through 
the medium of T. A. Publications, acted as a single united body in all matters in which 
the publications have a common interest. 

Under the merger plan, all funds collected by members of the school for the pub- 
lications are equally distributed to the effect that no publication suffers at the expense 
of the other. The handling of business matters is under the direction of the business 
manager of "T. A. Publications," Mordecai Katz. 

A special expression of thanks is due to Mr. Samuel Levine, our executive director, 
who has been of such tremendous assistance in the financial affairs of T. A. Publications. 



Thirty-Four 



KoL 



enu 




One of the most important organs of our school is our Hebrew publication, 
Kolenu. It affords the students a means of self-expression in modern Hebrew. 

Under the co-editorship of Irwin Witty and Nisson Shulman two issues were pub- 
lished. The paper has enjoyed the highest esteem of Hebrew enthusaists, writers, edu- 
cators and literary critics. The paper has been praised for its wide variety of articles 
and broad scope of topics A fine job was done in keeping the paper well-balanced and 
up-to-date. 

A great deal of credit is due Rabbi Faivelson, our faculty adviser. His unselfish 
and relentless efforts serve as a stimulus for further progress on this project. Other 
members ol' llic cditori.U board include Irving Circcnberg, lidwin Goldstein, Richard 
Siherman and Murray W'achman. 



Thirly-Fite 



T)lie Tjatler 




With only one term of circulation to its credit, the "Tatler" has already taken 
its place among the other leading high school publications. 

Hard work on the part of the editors, Richard Silverman and Irving Greenberg, 
and coupled with the enthusiasm and cooperation of the staff, rewarded us with 
this aspect of student expression. Other members of the staff who helped produce 
the pioneering T. A. Brooklyn tabloid are Irwin Witty, Arnold Enker and Murray 
Wachman. The paper is a revolutionary one in that it is a hybrid newspaper-magazine 
and of a unique size. Although only eight pages long for a starter, the paper in- 
cludes excellent news coverage as well as reviews, columns, editorials and articles of 
a general interest. Particularly interesting is the "Tatler" editorial policy, clearly in- 
dicated by the editorials in the first issue dealing with the Palesstine problem and the 
extra-curricular activities. 

Credit is especially due to our faculty adviser, Mr. David M. Horn, whose 
tireless efforts played an important role in realizing the publication of the "Tatler." 

The publication of further "Tatler"s is now up to you. The "Tatler" has a bright 
future in store if you will only pitch in with articles and financial aid. The editorial 
board knows you have what it takes. LET'S SEE YOU GO TO IT ! ! 

by Iriviii E. ]\"itty 



Thirty-Six 



ulte ScnooL Ch 



oir 




Choir Leader — Walter Orenstein 
Soloists — Irwin Witty, Martin Kahane 



The statement "Necessity is the Mother of Invention" can easily be pro\en by 
using the Yeshiva choir as an example. When the Jewish Department planned a party 
last Chanukah, it was realized that a choir would be needed to provide entertainment. 
The boys with the best voices in the Yeshiva were assembled and were asked if they 
would like to form a choir. Little was expected of them at the party but under the 
splendid leadership of Walter Orenstein the choir performed maijniliccntiy and was 
received enthusiastically. 

Despite infrequent rehearsals, the members of the choir are keeping their voices 
in pitch and are looking forward to being of service to the entire school and to repre- 
senting the school in interscholastic occasions and in public performances. They are 
scheduled to perform at the graduation. 

b) Sornntii Kuiz 



Tbirly-Seten 



iJne debating. Socle t if 




Other than the constant argumentation that is incessantly carried on throughout 
the school, the only type of organized interclass speaking that has made a stand for 
itself is under the sponsorship of the Debating Society. 

Hardworking Herbert Weisberg arranged the programs, ushered together the 
class debaters, and presided over a number of debates which Mr. Horn was prevailed 
upon to judge. 



The most important and profitable feature of these debating sessions was the 
criticism and the suggestions given the participants just before the decision was an- 
nounced. 



Thhly-Eight 



uke J4ebrew Club 




President — Edwin Goldstein 

Vice President — Arnold Enker 

Secretary — Norman Toporovsky 

Faculty Adviser — Rabbi Faivelson 

With a deep feeling for the necessity of being well informed in universal Jewish 
problems, the students of T, A. met and formed an active organization, the Hebrew 
Club of Talmudical Academy. Its main purposes are to help the T. A. student in his 
developing a fluent and contemporary Hebrew, and bring the T. A. student m 
contact with activities in Eretz Israel and with Jews all over the world. 

The club meets each Tuesday evening, and has a membership of 30 members. At 
these meetings, members sing Hebrew songs, have Hebrew discussions and debates, and 
regularly hear speakers on important Jewish topics of our day. On several occasions, 
Palestinian motion pictures have been shown, and on certain holidays the members 
have "chagigas" which are compatible with the general spirit of the holiday. 

The people who have attended the sessions of the Hebrew Club regularly have 
indeed been enriched by a cultural experience and have been taken in with the 
general Hebrew spirit that pervades all of its meetings. 



Thirty-Nine 



J^kotog-taphy. Club 




President — Paul Salkin 
Faculty Adviser — Mr. Strum 



The clicking of flash bulbs, the snapping of shutters, and the inevitable "a little 
to the left, if you please," are now a routine affair within the halls of the Yeshiva. Every 
Thursday evening at 6:15, the photography club hounds gather around Mr. Strum and 
listen attentively to his cryptic talks about bromides, hypos, and stuff. 



This consolidated group of fourteen amateurs, under the leadership of its Presi- 
dent, Paul Salkin, prepared a clear and precise outline of future plans. A photographic 
contest, and an exhibition in which the "Best of T. A." will get a chance to be appraised 
by our student critics, are among the many plans (and dreams) of the rosy future. 



Forty 



LJne Spanhn Club 




President — Seymour Halpern 

Vice President — Walter Silver 

Secretary — Alvin Weisbrod 

Editor of Paper — Paul Salkin 

Faculty Adviser — Mr. Cantor 

The furthering of the Spanish language in T. A. has been heralded by the 
establishment of a Spanish club under Mr. Cantor's supervision. The club meets once 
a week on Tuesdays, at 6:15 P.M. The membership cannot be officially registered at 
this time as the list is increasing with every meeting. 

The activities of the club include Spanish songfests, debates, short talks on 
Spanish culture, listening to recordings of Spanish music and a major accomplishment, 
a newspaper. It is a mimeographed sheet with timely articles written in Spanish. Some- 
day they hope to in\itc the entire school to a Spanish Fiesta. 



Porly-One 



ZJke Saiketball Veam 




Captains — Murray Farber, Irving Forman 
Coach — Hal Jetter 

With two defeats, one by R. J. J. and the other by T. A. uptown, and one victory 
over Ramaz to its credit, our basketball team has been initiated properly. 

Coach Hal Jetter has done a good job of molding a first rate team from the 
ruck of clumsy, gawky youngsters who came down to the first practice session. Our 
first game, after three weeks of intensive drills and scrimmages, proved to us that 
though we are far from perfect, we have a bright future in store for us. 

The uniforms donated so generously by the Ladies Auxiliar)- are modeled after 
the latest Fifth Avenue stj'les, embodying all the advantages of the "new look." 



BASKETBALL TEAM 



Marvin Blush 
Murray Farber 
Ir\ing Forman 
Leon Green 
David Hirth 
Bernard Hoenig 



Zev Hymowitz 
Stanley Jaffe 
William Kotkes 
Elihu Levine 
Samuel Silverstein 
Max Wagner 
Isaac Winograd 



For/y-Two 



DlU ^/. O. 




An election was to be held. The fifth election of our G. O. officers was under 
way. Nominations and campaigns ensued, and two students ran as presidential candi- 
dates. But when the ballots were counted, the winner was neither of these. Murray 
Farber won by a write-in vote, a most democratic procedure. 

The very fact that the students were able to, and did elect whomever they saw fit. 
regardless of who was running on the official ballot, demonstrated the fluidity and the 
fairness of T. A. Brooklyn's elections. This manifestation of true democracy at work 
is to be boasted of by every student of T. A. Brooklyn. 

After two years of careful planning and ardent work, the G. O. of T. A. Brook- 
lyn has finally emerged as a body capable of iioiding its head higli as an organization 
ranking among the finest and the best in New York City. 



Fvrty-ThiL'e 



mumi 



From the beginning, its growth has shown definite signs of development. The 
first step, which is always the hardest, was taken by Samuel Feder. During his 
administration, the organization of the G. O. was accomplished. 

Nisson Shulman as second president helped to establish the "G. O. Bi-Weekly" as 
a bulletin board feature in an effort to bring the G. O. closer to the student. Ping-pong, 
volleyball and punchball tournaments were held. Thanks to the nice old lady next door, it 
nearly cost us every volleyball we had. We solemnly salute those heroic individuals 
who had the courage to venture into her yard to retrieve those balls. 

The third election brought forth a new candidate, hitherto virtually unknown. 
Murray Farber won by only a ver)' small margin that first time, but soon he had the 
heart of the whole school in his pocket. 

His domestic polic)' was that of work, work, and more work, and his foreign 
poliq- ran along the same lines. The results of his foreign policy may be measured 
in terms of his enormous popularity. 

It was his administration that nurtured the write-in vote and introduced it into 
the realms of officialdom. It was this ver)' write-in vote that served to get Murray elected 
to a third term after he had withdrawn from the election. 

And to the many other officers and representatives who comprised our various 
administrations, we, the graduating class, say, "Thanks and thanks again for a splendid 
job, splendidly done." 

Nisson Shulman 



1948 



Forty-Four 



ELCHIIITE 



1948 



J\ zixo±J2£.ctu)n 



It is now , three years since registration started in the Brooklyn Branch of the 
Talmudical Academy. These three •years' have s€en the change from a school with as 
few boys in the halls between periods as can compose a self-respecting "minyan" to a 
school whose corridors, between bells, house a surging, struggling mass of humanity 
which cries aloud for room, moi'e'roorn. - 

Starting with two classes, we have now reached the stage where we may justly 
call ourselves a full-fledged Yeshiva 'and high' school, complete from freshies to seniors. 

Ours has been a rapid growth and a.gopd one. From the first, it was evident that 
we intended to accomplish things. In the very first year of school, our dreams of a 
volleyball, a ping-pong and a punch ball tournament were realized. Even a basketball 
court was set up. True, it wasn't much to look at, but Nve could play on it and enjoy 
ourselves. 

From then on, it was one success after another. Even the printing of our own 
G. O. buttons may be considered an accomplishment. 

How happy we were to receive a full page in the "Academy News" dedicated solely 
to "The Branch!" It inspired the publishing of our own newspaper, the "Tatler," which, 
with the help of Mr. Horn, shows signs of becoming a close rival of the "Academy 
News" itself! .^^ . . . . 

Even before this, thanks to Rabbr Faivelson and his student Editorial Board, came 
the crowning glory of T. A. Brooklyn, the one great accomplishment that has really made 
our school famous. Kolenu, the only printed Hebrew newspaper put out by students, 
was at last a reality. And this after only two years in existence. Since that memorable 
day when the first copies of Kolenu .were distributed still wet from the presses, we have 
put out another issue, exactly twice as large as the first. 

To Mr. Levine, our Executive Director, we owe thanks for assistance in the 
planning of one of our greatest accomplishments, namely, the financial unification 
of Kolenu, The Tatler, and the Elchahite, into an organization known as T. A. Pub- 
lications. It is because of this unification that the Elchanite is what it is today. 

Scholastically, we have always been top notch. We were proud of the fa;t that 
our teachers were the finest teachers chosen from the finest schools in New York and 
the better we grew to know them, the more we grew to appreciate them. The memory of 
every last one of thehVwill remain engraved in our hearts, for they have influenced our 
character even more than they ha\e inHuenced our marks. 

Yes, we have grov\n rapid!)'. AX'e arc proud of our scl"ooi and its accomplishments, 
for its accomplisiiments are really. oinvs. Wc look lorward lo hearing of and seeing even 
more done as the years go by. 

Nisson Shulman 



ForJy-Five 



EICHMITE 



by Nissan Shuhnan 



In days of yore, when man was young, 

He roamed the earth alone. 
The monsters of the sea and land 

This act did not condone. 
They fought him so ferociously 

That in a little while, 
A weapon he himself did hew — 
Of wood and then of stone. 

And man for all his savant sense 

Learnt to kill and wound and maim. 
With the weapons he himself had made 

For protection, not for gain. 
The annals of the time foretold 

That for all his cunning brain. 
He destroyed and killed his fellow man 

For lust, ambitious gain. 

And if gain is measured by what is saved. 

And profit by thrift alone. 
Then man would be losing a century a day. 

And trading a diamond per stone. 
By destroying a man who could build and create, 

A boonful blessing is blown, 
And helping a man who could worlds beget. 

Brings happiness, fortune, renown. 



1948 



Forty-Six 



194S 



ELCHAMTE 



_7«£ cf\£.hixili or Ui.za£.L 



Martin Kahanc 



The Wandering Jew has come home. Through the years of trials and tribulations, 
through the decades of hatred and persecution, with unswerving faith in the Divine 
Lord, he has struggled on unflinchingly. Down th long road of eternity he has walked, 
while about him empires have crumbled, and civilizations have come crashing down. 
He bears the scars of battle and has suffered the tortures of the damned. His treasury 
ot memories consists of the evils of this world of ours; of beatings .killings, tears 

and bitterness. Yet, through all these he has struggled on, on towards home. 

He is a many-faced person, this Jew. He is white yet black, short yet tall, hard 
yet gentle. He believes in war and in peace. He is everybody and he is nobody. But 
there is one thing which all of him looked longingly for, the only thing he did not 
have — a home. 

In his book of memories are indelibly inscribed such names as Rome and Spain, 
Czarist Russia, Nazi Germany, and treacherous Britain. In his brain are burned the 
faces of Titus and of Torquemeda, of Nicholas and of Plehve, of Hitler and of Bevin. 
Will he ever forget Kishinev, Belsen, Oswientzim, Cyprus, and an endless stream of 
cities of horror and camps of degradation? 

And now, in his last chapter, as his story draws to a climactic close, as his ageless 
search for a home is about to be rewarded, another name and another year are added, 
the U. N. and 5708. And the Jew walking down the dusty road of life murmurs a 
heartfelt prayer from the depths of his soul. He thanks G-d for giving his a lantern 
in the dark of night to illuminate the crossroads and to allow him to finally choo.se 
the right path home. 

Now, the Wandering Jew has reached the threshold. He has walked, he has come 
by ship. Perhaps he flew. He has come home by all ways and from all sides. From the 
tour corners of the earth home has beckoned to him. There are no bands to play, there 
are no shouts of joy, only a reverent silence. 

And as he steps into his home, the half-forgotten and smoldering memories burst 
into a fiery flame, and within his breast lies a great exultation. The shackles of exile 
fall off him and the yoke of the Diaspora is lifted from his neck. The legend of the 
country flowing with milk and honey has at last become a reality. 

Nevember 30, 19-i7 



Fof/y-Sereii 



ELCHIIITE 



"/ will life lip mine eyes unto the hills fro:n whence shall come my help." (Psalms 
121) 



The moon at last casts its beams on the State of Israel. From Metula to the 
Negev, from the "kibbutz" to Tel Aviv, with his gun in his hand the Jew stands 
guard. He is all the Ghana Seneshes rolled into one. He is the Joseph Trumpeldors, 
the Ben-Gurions, and the Abraham Sterns. He is Israel, and he is on guard ! 

From the sands of Arabia come the Nornads, from the hills of Galilee ride the 
Bedouins. From the North and South, from the ground and from the air, spreading 
death and destruction comes the enemy. Ishm.ael attacks the sorely beset children of 
Jacob. The desert of Sinai is stained with Hebrew blood. The River Jordan flows red 
unto the sea. The land of peace echoes unto v/ar. 

And in a far away land an august body of distinguished gentlemen speak of peace. 
The hours fly by, the people die, and the gentlemen speak, speak and speak of peace. 
The plea of an innocent people for help is heard, and the tortuous speeches continue. 
The council of nations, some of whose members' hands are red with blood, whose 
souls bear the stench of oil, choke the infant babe Israel still at its mother's breast. 

Will their cunning tricks succeed? Will their sly devices win? Will evil triumph 
over good? 

No ! The Jew will not yield ! For Akibah and Bar-Kochbah who died under the 
Roman boot, he cannot yield ! For Dov Gruncr and his young martyrs, he must not 
yield! For the untold numbers who died "ai kiddush hashem," he will fight and 
fight, and fight again. Let the league of Bedouins know this. Let Britannia realize 
this. Let the universe with its record of murders and hypocrisies remember this. To 
them the Jew proudly standing guard in his country can only say, "we shall win for 
it is good to die for one's country." 

May 15, 1948 



M^ 



1948 



Forty-Eight 



by Alex Hofjer 

The Jewish people in Palestine have proclaimed a state, Israel, and at long last 
the majority of our people realize that Eretz Yisrael and only Eretz Yisrael is the 
solution to the two thousand years old problem of Jewish homelessness. 

However, the most remarkable fact in connection with this is that the only people 
in this country who openly oppose the formation of a Jewish state are Jews. I refer 
to the American Council for Judaism, which consists of a handful of frightened Jews 
who have concocted some irrational fantasies. It is amazing that even now, in these 
times, people like Lessing Rosenwald, head of the Council, maintain that Jews should 
remain in the Galuth. They believe that it is necessary for the Jew to be dispersed 
among nations in order to bring the Divine Message to the people of the earth. 

Let me cite but a few cases illustrating the harm wrought upon the Jews by the 
Galuth in the way of spiritual deterioration. A spiritually deteriorating nation cannot 
improve others. 



The Marranos are often cited as an illustration of how little influence was exerted 
by the Galuth on the Jewish spiritual self, and of how the Jew, even outside of Pal- 
estine, can hold his own against all forces. This is a serious misconception, for it 
does not bespeak the facts. Separated from the rest of their people, lacking Hebrew 
books or any Jewish religious objects and with the dread of the Inquisition upon them, 
these "New Christians" dared not be steadfast Jews. 

Though the first Marranos of Spain knew Hebrew, possessed "Sforim," tried to 
be buried near their unconverted brethren and maintained as much Judaism as pos- 
sible, this did not continue for long. The knowledge of the "sacred tongue" degenerated 
with the succeeding generations. They had very little to guide them, and knew even 
less of the religion for which they were so unmercifully persecuted and thrown to the 
flames. Only a few oral laws and the Pentateuch in Latin translation remained. Sons 
were uncircumcised. Rosh - Hashonah was forgotten. 

The belief was widespread among the Marranos that the essential differences 
between Judaism and Christianity were the observance of the Sabbath and the worship 
of images. They justified their transgression of Mosaic Laws by interpreting a certain 
verse of the prophets in such a way as to allow them to worship in the churches 
as long as their hearts remained faithful to the G-d of Israel . 

The "New Christians" were the examples of the devastating influence and the 
heavy hand of the "Holy" Inquisition. Though these people readily sacrificed all 
for what they believed, they retained very little of that belief. Thus, while they deserve 
our most profound admiration, from the point of view of Historical Judaism these 
people have swerved far. 



Forty-Nine 



Though, as aforesaid, nobody can denounce them, there is no denying that 
because of circumstances their conception of Judaism was warped. While Jewish reH- 
gious education and observance of the Holy Days were given up, lighting candles on 
Friday afternoons and the customs of mourning assumed disproportionate significance. 

I am tempted to draw a parallel between the maimed Judaism of the Marranos 
of yore, and the equally perverted values of too many of our American Jews of today. Is 
this what Mr. Rosenwald desires to preserve .-* 

« « « « « 

Another illustration of the "blessings" of the "Galuth" is the Falashes, the negroid 
Jews of Africa, who managed to retain their identity for more than two thousand years. 

At first, the Falashes had little trouble with their African neighbors. However, in 
the thirteenth century, bloody battles were fought and large numbers of their people 
were taken captive or sold as slaves, while many others were converted by the Christian 
missionaries. 

These Ethiopian Jews are very strict in their observance of the Sabbath. They do 
not bring sacrifices on that day and abstain from lighting fires. On Friday evenings, 
the Cohanim, priests, usher in the Sabbath. After the services the entire congregation 
eats in the synagogue which is divided into two parts, one for the men and one for 
the women. In their prayer-houses, a special section called the "Holy of Holies" 
is reserved only for the "clergymen." 

They believe very stronly in asceticism and in fasting. This seeems to them to 
be of fundamental religious importance. They fast Mondays, Thursdays, and on the 
eve of the new moon. Even the seven year olds must fast. Intermarriage is strictly for- 
bidden. When one of the Falashes enters a Gentile home, he must first purify himself 
before entering his own home. 

Here are two examples of deterioration of Jewish life when removed from its 
natural habitat. Where the Marranos erred by adopting too much of the surrounding 
dominant culture, the Falashes, in order to avoid such pitfalls, have committed the 
equally grievous error of shrinking within their own shell. During this process the 
very same evil occurred. They lost their sense of values. Things unimportant in Judaism 
became paramount, whereas things vital were lost. 

These detailed illustrations, that of the Marranos and that of the Falashes, prove 
that the Jews in exile are hardly a power in spreading the noble ideals preached by 
the Torah. Instead, the Jews in Galuth commit one of two errors: either they segre- 
gate themselves from society like the Falashes, and their Judaism suffers of shrinkage 
and perversion of value, or hke the Marranos, they yield so much to the forces sur- 
rounding them that their religious ideals are hardly recognizable. 

Expecting the Jewish religion to flourish in a "Galuth" environment is ridiculous. 
It reminds me of the story that the Rabbis tell of the man who said to his friend, 
"Break the barrel but preserve the wine it contains." IT CANNOT BE DONE. 



Fipy 



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Our hearts fill up with joy at this, the first gradu- 
ation of the Brooklyn Branch of the Yeshivah Univer- 
sity. The project which was launched but three years 
ago as an experiment in advanced Jewish learning 
in our community, has now proven to be a resplendent 
success. 

I salute Dr. Belkin, President of the Yeshivah, for 
his foresight and leadership in affording the young 
men of our great borough the opportunity to attain 
an extensive and well rounded training. 

Brooklyn Jewry has reason to be grateful to the 
Yeshivah for its acomplishments in producing young 
men whose personalities represent a harmonious 
blending of Torah and Chochmah, piety and cultural 
alertness. 

To me, it is more than a graduation. It is witnes- 
sing the sacred and thrilling scene of Bikurim, the first 
ripe fruits which grew and matured on this young 
"Branch." Fruits that are destined for the Beth Hamik- 
dash to be consecrated to God, Torah and Israel. 

JOSEPH M. BAUMOL, Rabbi 

Yeshiva of Crown Heights 



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Greetings from 



Yeshivah Ohel Moshe 



JOSEPH IVRY 
LOUIS ROZMAN 
A. B. KRAMER 
SAMUEL SPIEGEL 
DAVID ZIESEL 
HARRY EFRON 



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Our Heartiest Congratulations 
to our dear friends 

RABBI and MRS. H. H. ORENSTEIN 

to their son 

WALTER 

and to the students and parents of the entire graduationg class 
of Talmudical Academy Brooklyn 

May the graduates continue their studies and become fine 
Americans and a credit to Israel. 



MR. & MRS. LOU G. SIEGEL MR. & MRS. SIDNEY SIEGEL 

and their Families 
209 West 38th Street, New York City 



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Greetings 



KAUFMAN, 
SKYDELL and SHATZ 

Certiiied Public Accountants 



545 FIFTH AVENUE 
New York. N. Y. 



Compliments of 



Mr. <5t Mrs. 
CHAS. I. MUSS 

and ADELE 



CCj) 



Compliments oi 



Mr. & Mrs. 
JACK BIRENBERG 



Comoliments of 



H. WOOL & SONS, Inc. 

Wholesale Dealer in 
BUTTER, EGGS and DAIRY PRODUCTS 



137 READE STREET 
New York City 



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Fifty-Six 



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greetings 



MR. & MRS. ISAAC MUSS 

in honor of the graduation oi 
their grandson William 



Compliments of 



MR. & MRS. BENJAMIN KATZ 

in honor of the graduation of their son 
MORDECAI 



Compliments of 



MR. & MRS. 
JULIUS BIENENFELD 

in honor of the graduation of their son, 
STANLEY 



Compliments of 



MR. & MRS. 

lERMAN E. WEALCATCH 
dLLid Family 



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Compliments 



Compliments of 



I 

MR. & MRS. O. HARTMAN i HYMAN & MORRIS LIFSCHITZ 



Compliments of 



MR. & MRS. A. SASSON 

and Family 



55 WEST 42nd ST. NEW YORK 18, N. Y. 



Best V/ishes 



MR. & MRS. SAMUEL FISHER 



and Sen 



Best Wishes from 



I Complirr.ents of 



MR. & MRS. WILLIAM HELLER | -^°^^^^' ^^'^^^^ Herbert. 

DAVID and MARILYN | Solomon David Fruchthanrler 

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'ompiiments of 



I Compliments of 



SCHUFFMAN BROS. 



REGENT THEATRE 



1215 Fulton Street 



Brooklyn 16, N. Y. 






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Compliments oi . . . } 



YESHIVA UNIVERSITY 

WOMEN'S ORGANIZATION 
BROOKLYN DIVISION 

Mrs. Joseph S. Greenberg, President 



Compliments of . 



ALEXANDER MUSS 

and Family 



Compliments of . . . 



MR. & MRS. MAX KELLMAN 



Best wishes to Mordecai Katz 
on his graduation, 

from an 
Uncle and Aunt 



Compliments ol 



MR. & MRS. SIMON KATZ 

AND CHILDREN 

in honor of the graduation of their nephew 

MORDECAI 



Vv'ith Compliments trom 



Ml. & MRS. JACK WEISELMAN 

and Family 



Compliments ol 



MR. & MRS. BARRY HERMAN 

and FAMILY 

of MODERN TOURS 



3ompliments oi . 

MR. & MRS. 
ISIDORE A. LEFKOWITZ 

and Children 

HAROLD 6, ZIPPORAH 



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Fifty-Nine 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. HAROLD JACOBS 
and Children 



NE 8-6041 

SHURAK'S DELICATESSEN 



1596 Bedford Ave. 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Compliments ot 



CAMP LAKOTA 

ON MASTEN LAKE 
"Wurtsboro, N. Y. 



Compliments of . 

MR. & MRS. ABRAHAM FISCHER 
and Family 



225 Penn Street 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Compliments of . , 

MR. & MRS. JACK KESTENBAUM 
and Family 



Ccmpliments ol 

MR. & MRS. MAX I. COHEN 
and Family 



BE 6-3316 

KLEIN'S KOSHER MEAT MARKET 

18 Ave. "O" Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. H, KAHANE 

and Children 



v^mpUmenls of . . . 

MR. & MRS. SIDNEY SILBER 
and Sons 



ComDliments 



MR. & MRS. SAMUEL LAUER 



Coriplinients 

MR. & MRS. SAMUEL BECKER 

and Family 



A FRIEND 

of 

WILLIAM KOTKES 



Compliments of 



MR. & MRS. A. RUBIN 

and FAMILY 



Best Wishes tc 

IRWIN PECHMAN 

From Max Rosenberg 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. HELLER 

MR. & MRS. SAMUEL SCHEINMAN 

THE WEINBERG FAMILY 

WESLEY PORTNOFF 



cmplim-rnts of . . . 

MR. & MRS. HARRY SCHARAGA 

and SUSAN FRIEDA 



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Sixty 



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Compliments oi 

MR. & MRS. SAMUEL BECKER 

and Family- 
Best Wishes . . . 

MR. «& MRS. SIDNEY SILBER 

and Sons 

Compliments of . . . 
MR. & MRS. SAMUEL SCHEINMAN 

and FAMILY 
Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. M. G. OKUN 

and Family 
Compliments oi . . 

MR. & MRS. LOUIS BOBROW 

In Honor Of Children 
SAMUEL and LAURIE 

JompUmsnts of . . ■ 

MR. & MRS. H. LERNER 



With Best Wishes . . . 

MRS. RUTH TOLVIN 

Compliments . . . 

MOSES FEURSTEIN 

MALDEN, MASS. 



■M. s - 



Compliments of . . 



MR. & MRS. SAMUEL LAUER 



Compliments . . . 

MR. & MRS. ABRAHAM FISHER 

and FamilY 

225 Penn St. Brooklyn, N. 

Phone: GEdney 6-0560 

CAMP MONROE 

for Boys and Girls 

MONROE, N. Y. 

RABBI H. S. PORT 

and JOSEPH KRIEGER, Directors 

Finest Kosher Cuisine 

Office: 1330— 52nd ST. BROOKLYN, N. 



Compliments of . . . 



A FRIEND OF 
N . ISRAEL 



Best Wishes 



MR. & MRS. L. GOLDSTEIN 
and Son 



"ompLments of . . . 

A FRIEND 

of 

THE YESHIVA 



Best Wishes from . . 






i 



REGENT THEATEE 



Best Wishes . . . 

MR. & MRS. M. BURG 
and Family 

652 Crown Street Brocklyn, N. 



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Sixty -Two 



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Best Wishes to 

NORMAN KATZ 

irom 
MOTHER and DAD 



Good Luck to 

M O R D E C A I 

On His Graduation 

from 

MR. & MRS. MAX AUSTER 



Congratulations 



HERBERT WEISBERG 

from 

MR. & MRS. I. GRUNER 



Compliments of 



MR. & MRS. LOUIS MUSS 

and FAMILY 



Congratulations and Best Wishes From 

The Rudoff Family 

To GRADUATE NORMAN KATZ 



Congratulations To Our Grandson, 

NORMAN 

FROM 
MR. & MRS. KATZ 

Compliments of 

MR. & MRS. DUDLEY FEIT 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. HYMAN KORMAN 

Friends of 
GILBERT DAVIDOFF 



SLocum 6-1220 



DR. M. S. ELSBERG 

Denial Surgeon 



522 Eastern Parkway 



Brooklyn 25, N. Y. 



Compliments To My Grandson, 

NORMAN 

From ABRAHAM GLICK 



Compliments of . . . 
MR. &. MRS. MAX DAVIDOWITZ 

and Son 



Compliments of . . . 

LINCOLN WINES & LIQUORS 

401 Tompkins Avenue Brooklyn 16, N. Y. 

Compliments of . . 

MR. & MRS. S. ISRAEL 



A FRIEND 

STANLEY ROTHMAN 



Greetings . . ! Compliments of 



RABBI DR. & MRS. CHARLES KAHANE 

1710 West 2nd Street Brooklyn, N. Y. 



MR. & MRS. I. SHIPPER 






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Compliments to 

LOUIS GERSTMAN 

DISPENSING OPTICIAN 

215 ROGERS AVENUE 
Cor. Union St. Brooklyn 25, N. Y. 



ComplimOTits of . 



BEN & SOL 

DELICATESSEN 



854 Franklin Ave. 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Compliments . . . 

ROSENTHAL & ZIVITZ 

KOSHER MEAT MARKET 

884 Franklin Ave. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. S. SCHERTZ 

Compliments of .. . 
MR. & MRS. ISIDORE S. RICHTER 

and Sons 

Morton Jacob, Seymour, Leonard 
Best Wishes . . 

MR. & MRS. MICHAEL TENZER 



Best Wishes To My Twin Brother 

IRWIN 
From Miss Toby Pechman 



Best Wishes ... 

I. FEIGELMAN 
ALBERT L COOPERMAN 
MORRIS & ANNA SUMMER 
PEARL RUBIN TAILORS 
MR. & MRS. HARRY SHERMAN 
MR. & MRS. S. STARISHEVSKY 
MR. & MRS. AARON SCHWARTZ 
MR. & MRS. JACOB LEVIN 



Compliments of . . . 

MR. & MRS. SAMET 

Compliments to 

KATZ BROS. 

223 Rogers Ave. Brooklyn 25, N. Y. 



Compliments to 

M I T T M A N ' S 

Skirts and Ladies' Slacks to Order 

253 Rogers Ave. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Closed Saturdays Phone: PResident 2-8741 

M. FELDMAN 

219 Rogers Ave. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Greetings to 

C. & H. HARDWARE and 
HOUSEFURNISHINGS 



200 Rogers Ave. 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Compliments of . . . 

TRACHTMAN'S PHARMACY 

4301— 1 0th Ave. Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Best Wishes . . . 

RABBI & MRS. M. SHULMAN 



Greetings from . . . 

MR. & MRS. AARON ZAHLER 
MR. & MRS. BLUTH 
MRS. P. REIFMAN 
MR. & MRS. PHILIP FLEMMING 
MR. & MRS. BERL 
MR. & MRS. SAPOFF 
KRAVITZ CANDY STORE 
"Next To The Yeshiva" 



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Sixly 'Four 



ADVEPTSSIHG & Pk'lINTiING CO. 
528 BLAKI: AVt.. _BpOO^a.Vl■^ 7, h. V. 

DiCKEr-is 5-5 no